Nutritional breakdown per 100g
Protein0g
Fat100g
Saturated fat7g
Carbohydrate0g
  of which sugars0g
  starch0g
Fibre0g
Energy 
900kcal
3700kJ
Na0mg
Ca0mg
Fe0mg
Vitamin A0µg
Vitamin C0mg
Vitamin D0µg
Vitamin E0mg
Vitamin B60mg
Vitamin B120µg

Canola Oil

Canola oil is a vegetable oil derived from rapeseed.

Canola Oil

Canola oil is a vegetable oil derived from rapeseed. There is some debate, much of it unfortunately ill informed, about the health benefits and hazards of using canola oil in place of other forms of oil.

What is not debated is what it actually is. Canola oil is derived from a variety of rapeseed that has been selected to have no or low levels of euric acid. This is because pure rapeseed oild contains high levels of euric acid which is toxic. Hence pure rapeseed oil is not useful in food production but only in industrial processes, as a lubricant and as a biofuel. Canola oil is so named because it is an abbreviation of "Canadian oil low acid" and has been available since the 1970s from varieties of rapeseed produced in Canada. However since the 1990s much of the Canola oil that is available is from Genetically modified sources which may be of concern to some people.

In food production it is often used as a cheap substitute for other oils, particularly olive oil, although it may also be substituted to avoid the olive flavour accompanying the purer olive oils. One advantage of Canola Oil is that it has a high smoke point making it suitable for high temperature cooking and frying. It is also suggested that it is lower in saturated fats than other oils, although if higher temperatures that can be achieved from  the high smoke point are used then that is a moot point as less oil will be absorbed by the food but at those high temperatures there is a suggestion that it gives off carcinogenic chemicals.

Should you use it? Up to you but the main argument it is often from GM sources and will contain euric acid but may be lower in saturated fats.

Alternatives

If a high smoke point is required for baking or frying then dripping or peanut oils are suitable alternatives. For lower temperatures olive oil is a good substitute. If the flavour of oilve oil is not required then use a processed olive oil and not a virgin olive oil.